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Whenever we talk about Huawei, it's normally within the context of the company's growing smartphone business. What we don't talk about as much is the Chinese giant's massive networking operation -- but it's this department that's making a big entry into the Internet of Things. Huawei has announced that it's buying Neul, a Cambridge-based startup that specializes in building low-power wireless sensors for monitoring in various industrial and medical applications. Neul is probably most famous for having built the UK's first smart road, a 50-mile chunk of highway designed to monitor traffic flow and avoid congestion. Huawei has pledged to use its vast resources to turn Neul's Cambridge HQ into an "internet of things stronghold" which, we're sure, will go down really well with those people who refuse to deal with the company on security grounds.

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Enjoy how Chrome and other apps share data back and forth on Android? Now you can get that feeling on iOS, since Google has updated Chrome to take advantage of the app extensions supported by iOS 8. That doesn't mean you'll be able to install any of Chrome's desktop extensions -- it just means links can be shared directly to any other apps on your iDevice, as long as they also support the feature. The update is rocking "iOS 8 compatibility" but no tweaks for the extra size of the iPhone 6 family have appeared yet.

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A passenger jet taking off from Washington D.C.'s Reagan National Airport.  The runway is obscured by the blast fro the jet engi

Google Now has been showing off alternate info for when your flight's been delayed for a bit, and as of late the app's looking to take another bite out of air transit frustrations: keeping an eye on ticket prices. Poking around on Google Flights for a trip will drop a card into the search giant's digital assistant now and will alert you when prices change based on your recent destination or itinerary searches. It's sort of like what Airfare Watchdog does, but is possibly more convenient. As pointed out by by Android Police, however, it doesn't look like searching for a flight on the likes of Kayak or Travelocity will trigger the same activity.

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Already a subscriber to media outfit Plex's services? Good news: when the company raises its prices at the end of the month, you won't be affected. For everyone who signs up for the firm's Plex Pass subscription come September 29th, however, the price of poker goes up. Monthly fees will raise from $4 to $5 and annual renewals will jump from $30 to $40. Hard to complain too much with those. The biggest change comes to lifetime memberships, as the associated fee is doubling. So, should you want to get in on unlimited access to the Pass for the rest of your life and only pay $75 for the privilege (instead of $150), you have less than a week to do so. The increase, Plex says, is in part due to new features and premium content that it's going to unveil in the coming months -- designing an entirely new app doesn't come cheap.

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New team collaboration / messaging apps are seemingly everywhere, from Trello to Slack to (now Microsoft-owned) Yammer. A new entrant Talko is interesting not only for its pedigree -- the team is led by Lotus Notes co-creator and former Microsoft Chief Technical Officer / Chief Software Architect Ray Ozzie -- but because it marks a return to the days when our phone was a tool for voice communication, instead of primarily text or pictures. In an introductory blog post, the Talko team describes an app that lets users talk, share and do. The idea is that communicating by voice while everyone is online is easier and others can catch up with the conversation at any time since the data is cached on Talko's servers -- Danny Ferry would probably not approve. Right now the app is iPhone only, while Talko says Android and web apps are on the way.

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UPS Store 3D printing

UPS' experiment with in-store 3D printers apparently went off without a hitch -- the shipping service has expanded the availability of 3D printing services from six test markets to nearly 100 locations across the US. While the hardware is still concentrated in a relatively small batch of cities, such as New York and Chicago, there's now a much better chance that a shop near you has the gear for printing everything from prototypes to a one-of-a-kind phone cases. There's no word of any additional rollouts at this stage. However, it's reasonable to presume that more stores will get on-the-spot object making if it proves popular with crafters nationwide.

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Student using smartphone in lecture hall

Not sure if you're depressed? Your smartphone may be able to clue you in. Researchers at Dartmouth have developed an Android app that keeps tabs on student behavior -- silently logging how long they sleep, the number of conversations they have, how much time they spend in class, at social events or at the gym and even stress levels and eating habits. Using well-known mental health surveys as a benchmark, researchers were able to use the data to determine if students in its test group were depressed, stressed out or lonely, and eventually found correlations between mental health and academic performance.

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When MakerBot announced that Bre Pettis would be stepping down as CEO earlier this month, we knew he wasn't going far. Today, the 3D printing guru's new project was revealed. The Pettis-led Innovation Workshop at Stratasys is called Bold Machines, and it looks to push "the frontier of 3D printing technology." Leveraging Solidscape 3D printers and devices both of the aforementioned outfits, the studio will work alongside "innovators" to flex its muscle. So, what's on tap to start? A movie made entirely with 3D-printed characters. The film focuses on Margo, a detective whose parents have gone missing during a space exploring expedition, and a businessman's evil schemes. In fact, you can go ahead and print your own Margot figure now, and production files for other characters, including the sinister Mr. Walthersnap (pictured with Pettis above), will be made available for at-home printing in the future.

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Image editing via Aviary

The world of image editing has changed a lot in the past few years -- you're now about as likely to tweak a photo on your phone or tablet as you are on your PC. Adobe is clearly aware of this shift, as it just bought Aviary and its cloud-savvy image editing platform for an unspecified amount. The two firms will work together on bringing Adobe's editing tools and Creative Cloud services to more mobile apps. That photography app you just downloaded on your phone could create Photoshop-friendly pictures, for example. There's no set timetable for integrating Aviary into Adobe's software platforms, but the quick turnaround from the Behance acquisition suggests that you'll see more powerful mobile editing suites within a matter of months.

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Earlier this year, researchers at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the BICEP2 telescope in Antarctica were thought to have found evidence of gravitational waves produced during the first moments of the big bang. The discovery was heralded as one of the most important discoveries of our era -- unfortunately, the results were contaminated. While going through peer-review, astronomers began to wonder if cosmic dust may have skewed the results. Now the verdict is in: it did, but that doesn't necessarily mean the theory is false.

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