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If you're planning to shoot your next movie using a drone, beware: you may need to meet some stringent conditions to stay in the Federal Aviation Administration's good books. Sources tell the Wall Street Journal that the agency will propose commercial drone rules that require a conventional pilot's license. Yes, you may need to have flown manned aircraft for dozens of hours to even think of controlling a UAV for cash. You'd also have to fly only during daylight, stay under 400 feet and remain within sight of your craft, so any hopes of high-altitude night shots would go out the window. And these rules would apply to any drone weighing 55 pounds or less; small, easy-to-fly vehicles like 3D Robotics' Iris+ and DJI's Inspire 1 would be subject to the same demands as larger, more complex models.

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HTC RE Camera review: a fun personal shooter with room to grow

My father's camcorder was a common sight on childhood vacations. Trips to Mount Rainier, the Oregon Coast, Disneyland, skiing, weddings -- you name it, there's video evidence of my siblings and I enjoying time together. I'm lucky to have grown up in an era where this technology was available, but today these memories can be captured more easily and with less sophisticated (read: less expensive) equipment. We have quick and easy access to cameras at a moment's notice, thanks to smartphones and tablets, and now another form factor is starting to gain momentum: personal cameras. With the exception of the GoPro, this genre is now seeing an influx of small, hand-held devices that are small enough to put in your pocket or bag and can still take decent photos and videos.

HTC is one of the companies rushing to get into this space with the RE camera (pronounced "Ree"), an awkwardly named gadget that's shaped like a tube, packs a 16-megapixel camera and 1080p HD video capture and features cross-platform support so Android and iOS users alike can take advantage of it. Can this tiny camera take the place of my father's camcorder? What else is it good for? And is it worth paying $200 even if you already have a smartphone camera? Keep REading to find out.

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Earlier this year, Tinder co-founder Whitney Wolfe left the company after launching a sexual harassment lawsuit against her colleagues. One of the allegations leveled was that co-founder Justin Mateen stripped her of her credit because her age and gender would harm the company's brand. It looks as if Wolfe may be about to get her revenge outside of the courtroom as well, since TechCrunch is reporting that she's teamed up with Tinder alumni Chris Gulczynski and Sarah Mick to create a similarly swipe-based casual sex dating app called, er, Bumble.

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NASA's 'remastered' Europa image

It's going to be a long, long time before anyone gets to see Jupiter's moon Europa first-hand, but NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory just provided the next best thing. It has released a "remastered" image of the icy celestial body that shows what it would look like to the naked eye. NASA's Galileo probe snapped the original photo mosaic (using near-infrared, green and violet filters) back in the 1990s, but they've been put through modern image processing techniques that simulate visible light wavelengths.

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NASA has been planning to study the magnetic reconnection between the Earth and the sun for years, and now the agency has revealed how its scientists are going make it happen. Magnetic reconnection is a process that converts magnetic energy to kinetic or thermal energy. It happens all over the universe, but close to home, it occurs during solar flares, coronal mass ejections and when solar winds interact with the Earth's magnetic field, causing aurorae. In order to study and create a 3D map of the mysterious phenomenon, NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale mission will send four spacecraft to space, which will position themselves in a pyramid.

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Life can he hard for the armchair particle physicist, forever knowing that other people have their own Large Hadron Collider and you don't. Thankfully, the folks at CERN remember what it was like not to have a LHC of their own, which is why the agency is opening up its data for all of the world to poke at. The CERN Open Data Portal will release the full details of each experiment three years after it was conducted, enabling the professionals to get their fill before everyone else gets a turn. The first set to be made available is from the 2010 collisions, and presumably the data set from 2011 will be along in short order, too. In addition, the outfit has prepared simplified collections from the various arrays for educational use, complete with visualization tools that'll help students taking the International Masterclass in particle physics. Now, of course, all we need is for some rank amateur to casually glance at the reams of data and come up with a world-shattering discovery of their very own.

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There's been a few signs that not all is well in Samsung's mobile division, with the company pledging to make fewer new devices, as well as its chief taking a pay cut. If the Wall Street Journal is to be believed, the cause of this unrest is all down to faltering sales of the Galaxy S5, which has apparently sold four million fewer phones than its predecessor. According to the report, the company is still riding high in the US, but saw sales in China drop by 50 percent compared to the Galaxy S4. Considering that Samsung was so confident that the device would be a blockbuster that it increased production by 20 percent, it could now have as many a four million unsold devices sitting in warehouses. The paper's sources believe that the drops will trigger a leadership re-shuffle, with mobile chief JK Shin getting pushed, with his duties handed over to TV & home appliance chief BK Yoon.

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UK Home Secretary Theresa May

The British government isn't letting up on its desire to track internet activity in the name of fighting terrorism. UK Home Secretary Theresa May is proposing a bill that would require internet providers to keep tabs on who's using a given internet protocol (IP) address and hand it over to the police, who could theoretically use it to hunt down suspects. Full details aren't available yet, but there would be some accountability involved. Police would have to get permission before collecting IP address info, and there would be documentation showing both when and why they needed that data.

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Apple has teamed with select app developers on a fundraising initiative for (RED) and World AIDS day (Dec 1st). For the next two weeks there will be a dedicated a section of the App Store where 25 partnering apps will be available with new or exclusive content. Titles taking part include high-profile names such as Angry Birds, FIFA 15, FarmVille and djay. All the sales revenue (including in-app purchases) from this section will go to (RED)'s Global Fund campaign. In addition to the apps, Apple is pledging to contribute a slice of select Black Friday sales, and is donating a portion of all retail sales on December 1 (cyber Monday). Apple has a long history of working with (RED), a charity co-created by Bono -- famously close to Cook's organisation. A relationship that has already seen Apple raise over $65 million for the fight against AIDS -- a figure you get to augment while spreading a little festive cheer this year.

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Living alone is pretty great: everything stays put when you leave and (perhaps, best of all) no one has to know about the guiltiest pleasures hiding in your Plex-bound digital media collection. Except, not everyone has that luxury and has to share their MKV library in addition to their living space. To make sure no one finds out about your secret stash of schlocky horror flicks, Plex is introducing Home, a home sharing system that separates content by user. Apparently switching between them is pretty fast too. And what's more, everyone has access to the respective apps on a given device. You can take care of server management within the web app as well, and Plex is promising super granular control over who sees what -- even down to a photo-by-photo basis. Naturally this is limited to Plex Pass holders, but free users will also get multi-user support. Now, if you'll excuse us, we have some media sorting to do.

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